Posts Tagged: Mindset

In the Classroom
10 Things Teachers Should Remember as They Begin Another School Year
August 8, 2018
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10 Things Teachers Should Remember as They Begin Another School Year

Lynnsey Metcalf
@sterchimetcalf

10. Restart your attitude every day! Some days are rough. Things go wrong. Always start your day with a positive attitude. Forget about the negative things that happened in the past and focus on the amazing opportunities in front of you.
In the Classroom
The Trouble with Deadlines: Accountability in the Secondary and Post-Secondary Classroom
July 31, 2018
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The Trouble with Deadlines: Accountability in the Secondary and Post-Secondary Classroom

Jeff Gray
@iteachushistory

When I was a junior in high school, my best friend and cousin finally succumbed to her lifelong battle with cystic fibrosis and died at the age of seventeen.  It was devastating for everyone in my family.  The morning after her death, I had a trigonometry exam.  The policy of the teacher – and all my teachers – was unless you have a doctor’s excuse, you were required to take an exam.  Since there was no doctor’s excuse, I came in that morning to take the exam.  Once I finished the exam, I left to aid in the preparation for the funeral.  There was no question I was going to take the exam.  It didn’t even dawn on me to try to get an extension as this was not a qualified excuse for missing the exam.  It was the expectation.
In the Classroom Professional Learning
Targeting Academic Success: How They Hit the Bullseye And How I (Almost) Missed It
July 24, 2018
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Targeting Academic Success: How They Hit the Bullseye And How I (Almost) Missed It

Amy Crawford
@AmyKCrawford

Over spring break, I had the opportunity to travel to Nicaragua with a group of eight high school seniors. While many of their peers were frolicking on beaches, guzzling beer through funnels, and striking provocative poses in barely-there bikinis, these kids were serving, leading, sacrificing, sharing, and loving. What makes this group even more unique is that all of them are graduating high school with GPAs north of 4.0 and an average ACT score of 32. Two of the students attend a private school, and six attend public high schools. 
 
In the Classroom
Teaching Is a League of Its Own
June 12, 2018
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Teaching Is a League of Its Own

Hayley Cloud
@hcloud_tn 

Probably one of the most “feel good,” memorable movies I remember watching growing up is A League of Their Own. I watched it many times, and I can still recall many quotes from the movie, such as the famous “There’s no crying in baseball!” But my favorite line from the movie is when Jimmy Dugan says, “It’s supposed to be hard. If it wasn’t hard, everyone would do it. The hard is what makes it great!” As a teacher, those words are something with which I can connect.  Teaching is hard. If teaching were easy, everyone would do it. Somehow, the hardest moments seem to always yield the greatest.
In the Classroom Policy
Students Are Compelled to Attend School, But Is School Compelling?
May 30, 2018
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Students Are Compelled to Attend School, But Is School Compelling?

Casey Ward
@caseytward

“The right to learn is curtailed by the obligation to attend school” - Ivan Illich from Deschooling Society “From the moment I could talk, I was ordered to listen” - Cat Stevens from “Father and Son”
In the Classroom
Grading Students on Growth
April 15, 2018
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Grading Students on Growth

Rachel Turner
@ChattanoogaChat

Iwasn’t born with the natural ability to ride a bike. Luckily my parents bought me one anyway and taught me, over time, how to ride. The first few times, I crashed and burned. I still have a scar on one of my knees from a nasty fall. But my parents were so patient and kept encouraging me to try again. Over time, I progressively improved my bicycle riding skills. While I never mastered this skill well enough to enter the BMX World Championships, I learned it well enough to survive while riding down the road!
In the Classroom
You Are More Than a Test Score
April 6, 2018
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You Are More Than a Test Score

Casey Dove
@CaseyMDove

As time for standardized testing draws nearer, you often hear a speech to kids that encourage them to do their best because they are so much more than one test score. There is incredible truth in that statement. Students are artists, athletes, musicians, student councilmen and so much more.
In the Classroom
Weird but Not Too Weird
February 5, 2018
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Weird but Not Too Weird

Leticia Skae
@LSkae

Is teaching a science? An art? Or a craft? Can it be a little bit of all of those things? My husband is an executive principal, and we often brainstorm ways to solve educational problems regularly. It is quite possibly our favorite pastime. But when discussed what makes a great teacher, he explained his hiring process to me. When he interviews a teacher he is looking for a teacher that is “weird but not too weird.” (A philosophy that I’m sure he uses even in love).
In the Classroom Leadership Professional Learning
Maximize Errors to Change Mindset
January 9, 2017
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Maximize Errors to Change Mindset

Michael Bradburn
@bradburnm

Students and teachers are working hard in and out the classroom on a daily basis.  Teachers are spending extra time planning, preparing, and thinking about their students to make sure everything is as good as it can get.  They want to have the perfect lesson, perfect materials, and perfect management plan.  Students are putting forth extra effort to make sure they have the perfect essay, perfect notes, and perfect solutions to their problems.   It seems that teachers and students are striving for perfection when mistakes are the precursor to successful learning.

What if we all stopped trying to be perfect and start learning from our errors?

Teachers naturally want to perform well and do an exemplary job in the classroom.  We want our students and co-workers to see us as amazing!  We put forth so much effort trying to achieve greatness that we may be missing great learning opportunities.  The effort and mistakes we make could lead us to learning new lessons or deepening our understanding.  Dwek’s idea of a growth mindset can have an impact on collaboration and teacher growth.  If a teacher has a fixed mindset, they may view the success of others as a failure of their own.  They see weakness in making mistakes or they may not try to implement new ideas because of the fear of failure of making a mistake.  When someone achieves great things, that makes teachers with a fixed mindset feel discouraged or inadequate.  Teachers with a growth mindset are more likely to share ideas and collaborate because the conversations could lead to both teachers learning.  They are more likely to try, and sometimes fail, at new strategies or ideas because they believe the failure leads to learning.  Teachers should be encouraged to see others’ success as a way to grow, collaborate, and share information to have an impact on all learners.

This translates directly to students.  Students may want to impress their teachers and peers.  The growth mindset can encourage learners to see their mistakes and the success of others as a way to grow and learn.  These students will often embrace challenges and risk failure to grow.  When teachers push their students to complete difficult tasks that they may not know how to solve, they can push them to try new strategies or require them to depend on peers for help and support.  In addition, teachers can become more aware of areas to reteach and focus instruction when errors occur and identified by students.

Everyone has the desire to be successful, but success often comes after a long line of mistakes and errors.

 

Michael is an Instructional Coach at Alcoa Elementary School. He has been an educator for 11 years. He received the East Tennessee PreK-4 Teacher of the Year in 2014 and the Wal-Mart teacher of the year in 2004. Michael is currently working on the Tennessee Standards Mathematics Review Committee and as a Teacher Partner in his school collaborating with teachers to impact student achievement. He was a Common Core Mathematics Coach in 2013. He is a graduate of The University of Tennessee, Knoxville with a Bachelor’s of Science and a Masters Degree in Child and Family Studies. He holds an Education Specialist Degree in Instructional Leadership from Lincoln Memorial University. He also serves as a Hope Street Group Tennessee Teacher Fellow, engaging his colleagues in providing classroom feedback to the Tennessee Department of Education on public education policy issues.

In the Classroom Leadership
Are You a S2.A.P.P.Y. Educator?
December 30, 2016
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Are You a S<sup>2</sup>.A.P.P.Y. Educator?

Tina Faust
@tntechgal
passionate educator, blessed to be a technology integration specialist

Have you ever had a time that left you extremely frustrated? Have you found yourself aggravated because you were excluded from discussions that will impact you? Have you felt disheartened because you were not a part of the decision making process?

I confess that I recently found myself in the above scenario. Like many of you, I am a passionate educator. I was frustrated over things that are out of my control. I found myself venting to a friend and grumbling to a colleague about initiatives that I felt excluded from but they will impact me. I became mentally drained and exhausted. I finally stopped mentally rehashing the things that are out of my control and realized that I was the one letting my frustration take root. I’m usually a positive person but I was allowing my negative reactions to impact me. It occurred to me that I have the ability to control me. Regardless of whether I agree or disagree with a process or decision, I can control my reaction and my focus.

I don’t want to be a yappy, negative educator but I want to always be a S2.A.P.P.Y. educator. I can control my thoughts and my actions. When I find myself frustrated, I can stop and find the positive in the situation and be a part of the solution, not a part of the problem. I can always have a positive attitude and I yearn to be a lifelong learner.

2017 is fast approaching. For the new year, my goal is to be a S2.A.P.P.Y educator. When I find myself getting frustrated, I will remind myself to self-reflect, be a part of the solution, keep a positive attitude, maintain a perspective that involves a positive mindset, and I will yearn to learn. I can learn from every situation and I can I always control my thoughts and my reactions. Feel free to join me and get S2.A.P.P.Y.!

Self-Reflect

Solutions-Oriented

Attitude is Everything

Perspective is Key

Positive Mindset

Yearn to Learn

A former high school marketing teacher with Jefferson County, Tina is currently the Instructional Technology Specialist for Hawkins County Schools where she works with teachers and administrators across 18 schools to integrate technology in K-12 classrooms. A Tennessee Department of Education iTunesU featured presenter, Tina has presented at numerous professional conferences including Tennessee’s first EdTech Summit. An advocate for technology integration, Tina works with professional societies to plan, and produce annual technology conferences for teachers across Tennessee. Tina holds a B.S. in Business/Marketing Education, an M.S. in Human Resource Development, and an Ed.S. in Instructional Technology from the University of Tennessee. She is currently pursuing her Ed.D at Liberty University. She also serves as a Hope Street Group Tennessee Teacher Fellow, engaging her colleagues in providing classroom feedback to the Tennessee Department of Education on public education policy issues.