Posts Tagged: Tips

In the Classroom
Practical Tips for Working with ELL Students in the Social Studies Classroom
December 1, 2018
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Practical Tips for Working with ELL Students in the Social Studies Classroom

Mary-Owen Holmes
@MsHolmesTeach 

In my sixth year teaching, I got the itch to move - a nagging sense that there was more to learn and more to do. This persistent feeling quickly led me to a new teaching position in a new district at one of the most diverse high schools in the city. Students are my new high school represent over 30 countries and speak upwards of 25 languages - the top 5 being English, Spanish, Arabic, Swahili, and Kurdish.
In the Classroom
What are We Missing with Story Problems?
June 6, 2018
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What are We Missing with Story Problems?

Cindy Cliche
@CindyCliche1

This summer a colleague attended a conference and was so excited to share her learning. One “take away” was a speaker that shared teachers should use the term “story problems” instead of “word problems” because the word “story” indicates that it is more than just a bunch of words and numbers. There is a context. Reflecting on this discussion, I begin to think about how much focus we are seeing in math instructional resources with numberless word problems, Bet Lines, and “notice and wonder.” I wondered if what we call the word/story problem is the whole solution, or is it how we support student understanding of the context of problems?
In the Classroom
End of the Year Letter to Parents
June 3, 2018
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End of the Year Letter to Parents

Amy Crawford
@AmyKCrawford

Every year, I write an End of the School Year letter to parents. This year, I took advantage of the opportunity to share some wisdom I’ve acquired through raising four children and teaching for over 25 years. Admittedly, I was a bit anxious to find out how the letter would be received. Thankfully, I’ve received multiple requests to “share” the letter on social media, as well as notes of appreciation from parents and grandparents. I’d like to share the letter with you in the hope that you will have the courage to share it, modify it, or simply think about the responsibility we have as teachers to educate our students.
In the Classroom
Six Ways to Incorporate Student Voice in Your Classroom
June 2, 2018
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Six Ways to Incorporate Student Voice in Your Classroom

Erin Glenn
@erin_glenn_edu

``So why do I have to do this….Because I said so!” Unfortunately, this type of conversation may occur all too often when students do not see the benefit or purpose of what they have been asked to do. Providing opportunities for students to have a voice in their classroom practices allows them to help shape their class environment and increases the likelihood they’ll follow outlined procedures and protocols. There are many ways to incorporate student voice in your class. Six of my personal favorites are found below:
In the Classroom
Day to Day in One to One
May 31, 2018
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Day to Day in One to One

Ashley Corey
@ms_corey8

Many schools and districts are taking the initiative to give all of their students access to technology on a constant basis. What is now referred to as “one to one” typically means that every student is given some sort of device such as a tablet, a laptop, or similar type of hybrid. The largest and most obvious hurdle to this kind of initiative is funding. With individual devices you tend to get what you pay for, and that makes giving over a thousand students a similar device cumbersome at best. When my school first presented us with the idea of one to one as a common practice, my actual questions did not deal with funds. As a classroom teacher there is only a limited scope of what I can control when presented with budget dilemmas.
In the Classroom
How I’ve Learned to Take Care of Myself While Teaching Students Impacted by Trauma
May 24, 2018
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How I’ve Learned to Take Care of Myself While Teaching Students Impacted by Trauma

Candace Hines
@Mrs_C_Hines

Just as most clothes are not one size fits all, teaching students that have been impacted by trauma is not a one size fits all situation. Each case must be treated very differently. One student may benefit from gentle reminders, private conversations, or social stories which give students an example of how to positively handle situations in the future. Another student may respond to firm consequences, consistent routines, or reflection journals.
In the Classroom
Middle Schoolers are Awesome! (Seriously!)
May 17, 2018
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Middle Schoolers are Awesome! (Seriously!)

Mary-Owen Holmes
@MsHolmesTeach

``What do you do?” “I teach seventh grade!”     “Oh, bless your heart!” As a middle school teacher, I have that conversation a lot. People imagine middle school to be full of scary, hormonal children. They’re not completely wrong, but they are missing how awesome tweens and teens can be.
In the Classroom
Grading Students on Growth
April 15, 2018
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Grading Students on Growth

Rachel Turner
@ChattanoogaChat

Iwasn’t born with the natural ability to ride a bike. Luckily my parents bought me one anyway and taught me, over time, how to ride. The first few times, I crashed and burned. I still have a scar on one of my knees from a nasty fall. But my parents were so patient and kept encouraging me to try again. Over time, I progressively improved my bicycle riding skills. While I never mastered this skill well enough to enter the BMX World Championships, I learned it well enough to survive while riding down the road!
In the Classroom
Weird but Not Too Weird
February 5, 2018
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Weird but Not Too Weird

Leticia Skae
@LSkae

Is teaching a science? An art? Or a craft? Can it be a little bit of all of those things? My husband is an executive principal, and we often brainstorm ways to solve educational problems regularly. It is quite possibly our favorite pastime. But when discussed what makes a great teacher, he explained his hiring process to me. When he interviews a teacher he is looking for a teacher that is “weird but not too weird.” (A philosophy that I’m sure he uses even in love).
In the Classroom Professional Learning
What I Didn’t Learn in My Teacher Preparation Program
January 17, 2018
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What I Didn’t Learn in My Teacher Preparation Program

Rachel Turner
@ChattanoogaChat

Now in my eighth year as a teacher, I often chuckle when I reflect on how far I have come in my teaching career.  Just a few short years ago, I was a clueless student teacher eager to change the life of every student I met. I did not know much, but I knew that I did not want to be like the Economics teacher (Ben Stein) in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off or the teacher in Peanuts. I envisioned being a mix between John Keating (Robin Williams) in Dead Poet’s Society and Louanne Johnson (Michelle Pfeiffer) in Dangerous Minds. Instead, I entered the classroom more like a cross between John Kimble (Arnold Schwarzenegger) in Kindergarten Cop and Sherman Clump (Eddie Murphy) in The Nutty Professor.  Luckily, I have thick skin and stuck with the most rewarding career one can have.  However, I often think back and wonder why so many aspects of a teacher’s career go unmentioned in our preparation programs.