Posts Tagged: Tips

In the Classroom
Developing Lifelong Readers Before It’s Too Late
November 30, 2017
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Developing Lifelong Readers Before It’s Too Late

Casey Ward
@caseytward 

In 2015, the percentage of American adults who read for pleasure fell to its lowest ever mark. Books, especially complex works of literature, are being ignored by a large portion of our population. Worse still, those citizens who hold only a high school diploma are three times less likely than those with a college degree to have read a book in any format in the past 12 months. Only 60% of high school graduates reported reading a book “in whole or part.” While we may assume the best - perhaps they joined the thousands of others who abandoned Ulysses after the first 300 pages - it is far more likely that their reported reading consisted of a few recipes from a Bobby Flay cookbook.
In the Classroom
How Have I Survived 25 Years of Teaching?
October 29, 2017
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How Have I Survived 25 Years of Teaching?

Al Feldblum
@afeldblum

Istarted my teaching career with two strikes against me. One, I am a high school math teacher; the only school subject with a recognized, known phobia. Not only must I overcome “Math Phobia” with my students, but also I must listen to adults say, “I hated math in high school,” or “I was terrible at math.”
In the Classroom
Questioning: A Vital Part of Classroom Discourse
October 24, 2017
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Questioning: A Vital Part of Classroom Discourse

Casey Dove
@CaseyMDove 

Every teacher, regardless of grade level or subject area, is told to write a lesson plan that includes pre-planned questions to be asked of the students as the lesson unfolds. These questions include basic checks of understanding as well as higher order questions to provoke the most advanced students’ thoughts. What if I said that the students’ questions are just as important as the best planned questions that teachers include on their lesson plans?
In the Classroom Leadership
Find Your Mrs. P
October 22, 2017
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Find Your Mrs. P

Jeff Gray
@iteachushistory

My experience as a first year teacher is not unlike many others in the teaching profession. I was fresh out of school, ready to change the world. My first teaching job found me in a large southern city with a sordid, but progressive history in public education. I was assigned to teach 8th grade social studies in a large middle school located physically in a solid middle class suburb. However, our student population was anything but solid middle class. Through the then constitutional busing policy, our student population was majority minority with a high percentage of free and reduced lunch. Our faculty was full of “newbies” just like me, trying to change the world.
In the Classroom
How Project-Based Learning Revolutionized My Teaching
October 6, 2017
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How Project-Based Learning Revolutionized My Teaching

Mary-Owen Holmes
@MsHolmesTeach 

Over the past few years, Tennessee has been committed to making bold changes to our educational landscape. We’ve seen shifts in what our students are learning, and are striving to ensure all students receive a high-quality education. Project-based learning (PBL) is a natural extension of our state’s focus on reform. A renewed emphasis on college and career readiness has encouraged teachers and schools to incorporate strategies such as problem-based learning and technology integration, while also providing more opportunities for early-work experience. Across Tennessee students are learning to broadcast news, lead research efforts, build websites, code programs, and analyze data, while embedding math and literacy into their work. PBL has allowed me to better connect the past to the present, as well as bring fun back into history class. When we connect our classroom learning to real-world examples, as well as necessary critical thinking and problem-solving skills, everyone wins.
In the Classroom
10 Things I Wish I Knew As a Beginning Teacher
October 4, 2017
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10 Things I Wish I Knew As a Beginning Teacher

Dr. Beth Gotcher
@beth_gotcher

Candace Hines
@Mrs_C_Hines

10.Speak up: Your voice matters! In a room full of veterans, novice teachers often tend to take a back seat. New teachers may get overlooked due to their lack of experience in the classroom. As a beginning teacher, you may be hesitant to ask clarifying questions or contribute new ideas. However, when beginning teachers speak up, they can benefit the whole group by sharing new concepts. Mentors are also able to see their growth areas and refine their mentorship to allow new teachers to gain knowledge. So don’t be afraid to share your ideas!
In the Classroom Policy
You May Say that I’m a Dreamer, but I’m Not the Only One: Reimagine Career Readiness
September 9, 2017
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You May Say that I’m a Dreamer, but I’m Not the Only One: Reimagine Career Readiness

Amanda Arnold
@Amanda_Arnold77

John Lennon once said, “Imagine all the people living for today.” This is such a simple statement, yet so hard for so many students to do. Career readiness is a critical part of education that students need for living everyday lives. Students must receive education that prepares them for excellence in all labor.
In the Classroom Professional Learning
Less Work (Teacher) + More Work (Student) = Rigor
June 10, 2017
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Less Work (Teacher) + More Work (Student) = Rigor

Cindy Cliche
@CindyCliche1

As another school year comes to a close, many educators reflect on successes and begin to set goals for the upcoming year. One word seems to be a part of many conversations: RIGOR. It comes up in evaluation conferences, Professional Learning Communities (PLC), and grade level planning team meetings. Yet many educators still seem to have some confusion about what rigor looks like in the classroom.
In the Classroom Professional Learning
Blended Learning and Education
June 3, 2017
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Blended Learning and Education

Elaine Vaughan
@evaughan77

Blended Learning: When I first heard those words, I was not impressed. I imagined all my students doing their math on a computer with little or no assistance from me. I knew that within 3 years my students would each have a laptop so I started doing some research on integrating mathematics and technology. I learned very quickly that my interpretation of blended learning would take on a new role and realized that I could combine classroom learning with online learning in which my students could, in part, control the time, pace, and place of their educational experiences. I also discovered two main ideas concerning differentiation and the mathematical practices and how my support of a blended learning environment within the classroom could enhance student learning.

Differentiation and Blended Learning: Every educator’s desire is to determine the learning styles (visual, kinesthetic, or auditory) of the students in the classroom and promote student investigation through multiple representations. Students may discover and experiment with graphing, examining tables, and analyzing concepts by using free online tools such as Desmos and Geogebra. A teacher should carefully evaluate the technological resources to assure the support of student learning of mathematics and the advantages offered in posing mathematical problems as well as illustrating mathematical ideas.

The Mathematical Practices and Blended Learning: Many of the Mathematical Practices dealing with problem solving, reasoning and constructing viable arguments, modeling with mathematics, and using appropriate tools are supported by various online programs and videos. Dan Meyer has developed many mathematical exercises that not only incorporate the practices into learning but also create scenarios that prompt students to stop and think about how to formulate solutions to the problems. One of these problems is called Meatballs and the Three Act Math Task: Will It Overflow? (http://www.101qs.com/2352-meatballs) Students work with the information observed in the three videos to solve the problem.  Educators may also choose Khan Academy, create flipped lessons, or use lessons from YouTube for students who need more practice or understanding on standards. Teachers also have various alternatives for on-line formative assessment such as Kahoot, Google Forms, Socrative, Quizlet, or student designed presentation using Screencast-O-Matic. Listed are just a few of the online learning tools for educators to use in the classroom.

Three years have passed since I first heard about Blended Learning. The ninth and tenth graders at my high school all have laptops for learning. I now realize that I will never be replaced by a computer and that I may serve as a facilitator in the classroom. The questioning techniques along with problem solving progress at a much higher level of learning for students. I am also preparing my students for the future world of work through the collaborative and communication skills they are utilizing with their peers. As an educator, one needs to keep in mind that all of the learning tools available for students take time to implement or adapt for multiple learning styles and that the technology should always support the mathematics. Also, an educator may want to investigate online professional development (MOOC-Ed, North Carolina State, https://place.fi.ncsu.edu/local/catalog/catalog.php). Whatever the decisions made in moving students forward in a technological world, the rewards far outweigh the drawbacks. I am now convinced that a Blended Learning environment will enhance my students’ work skills as they become productive citizens of the future.

Dr. Elaine Vaughan is a mathematics instructor at Oak Ridge High School for 20 years. She is a National Board Certified teacher, Professional Learning Communities Coach, and member of the Response to Intervention district and school board. Elaine is also a member of Delta Kappa Gamma and serves on the XI State Vision Board. Through this organization, she received both state and international scholarships. Elaine was a state mathematics textbook reviewer during the 2013-2014 school year. Elaine received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Mathematics Education from the University of Tennessee and her doctorate from Walden University. She also serves as a Hope Street Group Tennessee Teacher Fellow, engaging her colleagues in providing classroom feedback to the Tennessee Department of Education on public education policy issues.

In the Classroom Professional Learning
Behavior Management with a PURPOSE
May 17, 2017
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Behavior Management with a PURPOSE

Michael Bradburn
@bradburnm

The first year of my teaching career was full of growth and a lot of professional learning.  Most of the growth occurred because of a young man who I welcomed into my kindergarten classroom during the second week of my teaching career. I got a call that I would be getting a new student in my classroom who has some “behavioral concerns.” As a first year teacher, I thought I was prepared for ANYTHING and ready for the challenge. Little did I know, he was ready for so much more! I met Aaron in August of 2004 and his impact on me as a teacher will never fade. The day started with me trying to convince him to stay in my classroom for all of the fun we had planned and the day ended with me convincing him the day was over and it was time to go home. During the day we were learning our colors and he got very angry because I asked him to use his purple crayon and he only had a violet. Each and every transition consisted of me setting a timer, dodging his shoes and school supplies, and typically watching my back for a punch or a kick. Aaron showed me that a behavior plan centered on a reward was not going to impact or teach him how to behave.

The why of management must be considered. We have to remember the goal when we manage our classrooms and potentially punish our students for misbehavior. It is because we, as teachers, want to help our students become better people not just compliant students. There are two questions that I think about when I am planning, implementing or reflecting on my behavior management and how we can help our students become better people.

What is the behavior that I want to teach them?
When we manage our classroom our goal should be to teach our students the appropriate way to behave. We have to ensure that we are clarifying how to respond appropriately. For example, when we have a student who is consistently interrupting we may ask the student to wait to speak or to raise his or her hand without any more explanation. However, if a teacher clarifies that we should raise our hand or wait to speak because it is disrespectful, the student can attach the behavior to an expectation. This clarification could be tied directly to a positive behavior plan and reinforcement because the positive choice is shared and the students can choose to be respectful and then be reinforced for that behavior.

Is this something I need to manage?
As teachers, we try to anticipate the actions of our students. One way we try to assist in smooth transitions and increase engagement is through structure and routines. However, these routines may cause us to manage our students more than we are able to teach. For example, I used to assign carpet spots during large group instructional time. This strategy worked for several years until I had a classroom full of students who needed to be separated. At that point, I didn’t have enough spots for them to be away from one another. This group allowed me to reflect on the need for spots. I realized I was doing the thinking for the students and not allowing them to make the appropriate choice.  From that point forward,  I allowed my students to select their own spots in the classroom. When students make the appropriate choice to separate from their friends or ignore someone talking with them I am able to positively reinforce that behavior and reward them.

With the constant push to implement positive behavior plans it is important to be familiar with the process and focus on the WHY of behavior management.  Our job is to ensure that we are teaching our students the appropriate ways to behave and choices that will make them better people and prepare them for their future.

Michael is an Instructional Coach at Alcoa Elementary School. He has been an educator for 11 years. He received the East Tennessee PreK-4 Teacher of the Year in 2014 and the Wal-Mart teacher of the year in 2004. Michael is currently working on the Tennessee Standards Mathematics Review Committee and as a Teacher Partner in his school collaborating with teachers to impact student achievement. He was a Common Core Mathematics Coach in 2013. He is a graduate of The University of Tennessee, Knoxville with a Bachelor’s of Science and a Masters Degree in Child and Family Studies. He holds an Education Specialist Degree in Instructional Leadership from Lincoln Memorial University. He also serves as a Hope Street Group Tennessee Teacher Fellow, engaging his colleagues in providing classroom feedback to the Tennessee Department of Education on public education policy issues.